Tagged: Writing

Time, Tablets, and Titilation

Wow, it has been a few months. I have been busy, doing some really great things. Obviously, I haven’t spent as much time writing as I would ideally like. I plan to let go of some of my extra commitments later in the year, to hopefully allow me to concentrate on other important things more, such as writing!

In the meantime,  fitting at least some writing time, and handling work tasks means being efficient. At one point, I advised people that they would never be able to completely give up the laptop for a tablet. I am really wanting to do just that though. My current tablet is not quite up to replacing my laptop completely,  but I find myself wanting to shed my bulky laptop as often as possible.

With the upgrades in Google Drive and the office apps there, I really find that my tablet can handle my writing needs much of the time. In fact, in a pinch, even my smartphone is a capable platform. I can also do research, listen to music, stay apprised of important work communications,  and even watch adorable pet videos on Netflix.

Advertisements

Google Drive as a Tool for Writing

Writing on the go, to me, is just called writing. I am always on the go. I have an active life, and I am busy with many things. Therefore, an important part of any tool for me is portability. I have a smartphone, a tablet, a laptop, and a desktop that I use for writing. I prefer my desktop over everything else, but I have the others because life has other demands for me. One big thing I looked for in my writing tool is the portability, and the ability to work across multiple platforms.

Google works well on my windows desktop and laptop, and also works via apps on my smartphone and tablet. One drawback to the android app is that spell-check does not work. This can be an advantage sometimes, when I need to keep writing and suppress my need to constantly edit as I am writing. As it is, I switch to the desktop or laptop for final edits, and access to the spell-checker.

Another great tool inside the online version of the Google word processor program is the ability to research topics. I can highlight a word, and then go to the tools menu and select research. This will open up a side pane with relevant links. This is nice when I am doing some quick research for a story I am writing. It can be distracting, as I do have a tendency to love research.  The word processor offers all of the basic formatting features I need, and allows for the exporting of documents in commonly used formats, so that I can port it over to Adobe InDesign or Microsoft Word as needed.

The spreadsheet also comes in very handy. I use it to keep a “plot workbook” as I call it, with my notes for each chapter, POV, and character and place notes. This helps me to keep ideas, and to re-orient quickly when I resume working on a particular story.

In the future, I hope to band together with some other authors and publish an anthology.  Google Drive allows me to collaborate easily with others. I believe it is even now possible to track who made what specific changes to a document.

It took me a while to settle on my writing tool. I do not like to post public criticisms, so I will not mention specific software, but I did try many. I tried dedicated writing apps, designed specifically for writing stories. I tried various combinations of software in conjunction with cloud storage, I even tried some popular note-writing apps to see if they would work out for me. Google docs is what I ended up coming back to.

I remember reading a review of an app, and it really resonated with me when the author of the article stated that power users often like more simple app interfaces, whereas newbies usually like “flashier” apps. I am not sure about the power user versus newbie distinction, but I know that I do appreciate a simple interface. Google Docs does provide that simple interface that I appreciate.

One more great thing about using the Google Docs on Google Drive, is that Google Docs do not count toward the space limit. In other words, you can have an unlimited amount of Google formatted documents on Google Drive.

Wherein I Muse that ALL Fiction is Fantasy

DeviantArt
Creative Commons

I have thought recently about some of the principles that I believe in when it comes to fiction stories and genre. I am not speaking about genre in the more traditional sense. When I go to Amazon, I realize that if I go to the Fantasy section, then I will get results that reflect books having to do with magic, mythical creatures, swords, and the like. I am speaking in this post more to the general idea of a fantasy. A fantasy is something created in one’s imagination. Something that has not actually happened. See how that fits into fiction? Fiction is a story that never actually happened, created from someone’s imagination.

Of course the next question you have, after accepting that premise, is, “So what?” I hear you. I notice many writers and readers get caught up in the “reality ” of stories. In science fiction, I have seen some argue about whether or not space travel in X manner (notice I dodged the argument by using a variable instead of mentioning a specific method.) Some people only want to write or read those science fiction stories that reflect realistic technology. My take on it is that it is called science FICTION for a reason . If it was real, it would be called a science textbook.

What I see many authors gloss over these days, however, is what I call internal consistency. This applies to everything that is created within the story. It applies in many ways, and it requires the writer to be somewhat cerebral. Before he became delusional and arrogant, M. Night Shyamalan created the Sixth Sense. He created certain rules that he followed throughout the movie. For example, anything the dead interacted with in the physical world was red. After the surprising ending, one could go back and see all of these rules in place throughout the movie. I remember seeing an interview with him, where he described going through scenes and looking for discrepancies in the color scheme, sometimes finding a problem right as they were starting to shoot.

This, to me, is internal consistency, and is very important to me in the stories that I enjoy. I want stories to be consistent with the rules created in that world. If this is a story where the ghosts cannot speak to the living, then I do not want to catch a ghost talking to a living person, unless there is a development in the story that accounts for this. I don’t want to see a character that acts wildly outside of their established personality. Internal consistency, in my estimation, is critical in any fiction story. As far as whether or not certain elements are realistic? It is all fantasy, which is not real by definition.

What is Your Reader/Writer Personality? A Quick Test

There are many different personality tests, and they are often used in organizational psychology, where consultants work in the workplace to help co-workers understand one another. I recently took one at work, as I have also done in the past, and I thought of how it applied to those who read or write fiction. I have decided to use the True Colors personality type here because of its simplicity and applicability, but as I mentioned before, there are many others available.

True Colors was started by Don Lowry in the seventies, and still has a strong following. It categorizes personality types into four broad categories, based on a color. The green in me (you will know what that means soon), feels compelled to warn you that the human condition is not easily simplified into four discrete categories. In other words, the accuracy and applicability of this personality test will only get you so far. You know you the best, and you may have more than one color personality type that influences you, or it may vary based on the particular topic or situation. Overall, however, I think this is a good metric for building understanding.

For those in critique/writing groups, I think that understanding ourselves and others also goes a long way toward dealing with conflict. When we see these personality colors in ourselves and others, we can appreciate our differences, and view others as different instead of viewing them as wrong.

I am going to explain each personality type is it applies to fiction writers and readers. Please note that this is based on my own subjective view of writers and readers, as well as my knowledge of the True Colors personality types. I like to think I am a pretty effective therapist and manager, but I am also human.

Click here to take the personality test. Then return here to see what you personality type means for you as a reader or writer of fiction.

WikiMedia

Gold: Consistency

The gold personality is one that thrives on rules and traditions. They have a strong sense of duty and commitment. They desire things like punctuality and organization. They measure worth by completion. They are likely to be a part of groups, and like to be respected. They enjoy being in positions of authority, and like to bring stability.

As a Reader

These are the so-called “grammar nazis” that everyone refers to. Rules exist for a reason, and golds do not like to read the work of people who refuse to follow the rules. They appreciate worlds, characters, and stories that are internally consistent, and follow the rules of writing. They have no use for works that are riddled with grammar, spelling, or punctuation errors. Golds can sometimes get lost in the nit-picky details, to the exclusion of the more emotional aspects of writing. Writing is a science, not an art.

As a Writer

Great at editing, golds go the extra mile to ensure every last typo is tried, convicted and executed. They tend to put a lot of thought into their stories, and like it when all of the rules of their fictional worlds are explored and adhered to. The three act structure. show don’t tell, and other traditional rules of writing and publishing are their bread and butter.

In a Writing/Critique Group

They make it a point to be on-time, and to follow through on their commitments. They appreciate others who are also punctual and follow-through on their commitments. They like to set up the rules and to help govern the group. They have little tolerance for people who are late, do not follow the rules, or do not follow-through on their commitments. They are the person everyone turns to for grammar advice, or when they believe a general rule or guideline will assist them. They can come across as harsh, rude, judgmental, and overly concerned with “rules.”

WikiMedia

Blue: Feeling

The Blue personality values nurturing, relationships, and emotions. They are very much drawn to literature and love symbolism. They love expression and creativity, and encourage the same in others. Blues need harmony, and make decisions based on feelings.

As a Reader

They want to connect with characters, and love stories that convey an inspirational message. They tend to like stories that have happy endings that neatly tie of all conflicts with a nice, silky bow. They love stories that are creative, and can be bored with stories that are too far “inside the box.” Some typos and mechanical errors are okay, as well as some minor holes in the plot, as long as they have a good feel for the characters and the characters are creative and compelling.

As a Writer

They tend to be “seat-of-the-pants” writers, and really like to develop their characters to the fullest. Conflicts in their stories will often force their characters to examine their feelings and character flaws, and grow as “person.” They thrive on positive feedback from others, as that is really why they write. They strongly believe in ideals, and bring that into their writing. They have a difficult time dealing with confrontation, can move at a slow pace, lose sight of important details, and do not tend to initiate.

In a Writing/Critique Group

The group cheerleader, they want to make sure everyone knows they are valued and heard. They can sometimes have a hard time with not taking criticism personally. They often do well at finding compromise. They love opportunities to be creative and connect with others emotionally.

WikiMedia

Green: Thinking

Innovative, and logical, they like to be seen as being competent. They are curious, require intellectual freedom, and can question authority. They seek perfection in all that they do, including play activities. They seek intellectual stimulation, and value trying to solve intriguing problems. They can be oblivious to emotions at times and can be seen as being detached.

As a Reader

Grammar, spelling and punctuation errors bother them, but a small amount can be overlooked if the rest of the story is compelling. They prefer stories that are well thought out, and have little tolerance for poorly developed magic or other systems that do not seem to follow a logical trajectory. They value brevity and concise communication. They like to analyze any systems that may be at play in the fictional world.

As a Writer

They tend to spend a lot of time thinking and researching. No detail is too small to spend an inordinate amount of time researching and thinking about before proceeding. They tend to overlook the more emotional aspects of stories, such as scene descriptions and emotional expression by characters. They like to bring innovation to their writing. They are constantly seeking to improve their writing skills. They can be hesitant to try new things. Sometimes they can get so lost in the details of a story, and “thinking things through,” that they forget to write the story, or get bored and move on.

In a Writing/Critique Group

They are curious, and value differing viewpoints. They want people to respect them, and to feel valued as a part of the group. They are good problem-solvers, and at organizing a workable system for the group and the group structure, such as how and what is reviewed in the group. They can have a hard time making decisions in an effort to fully think things through. They can be seen as being cold, detached, on unemotional to others, particularly those strongly connected to feelings. They do not tolerate “fools.”

WikiMedia

Orange: Adventure

Oranges are free, spontaneous, and impulsively take risks. They are active, optimistic, and thrive on crisis. They are animated and dynamic, love to be the center of attention, and are very competitive. They are generous and optimistic. They are fun, and bring excitement.  They need public recognition of their abilities. They are enthusiastic, but tend to over-commit and overestimate results. They act first and think second.

As a Reader

They appreciate stories that cater to their sense of adventure. They like bold books, and love variety on their bookshelves. Formulaic novels bore them to tears, and they may often switch from one story to the next, depending on their current whims. They like stories filled with adventure, in one form or another. They will tend to avoid stories that they see as overly depressing.

As a Writer

They don’t like deadlines. Rules can be important, but sometimes it is just as important to find creative ways to break all the rules. They do not like to feel controlled in their creative endeavors. They like to write big, bold and beautiful. They like to write about action and adventure. Writing is an art, not a science. They are the ultimate, “seat-of-the-pants” writers. Oranges can “figure out the details later, when they get there.” They believe stories should be fun to read.

 In a Writing/Critique Group

They can sometimes have trouble fitting in and finding acceptance. They can be competitive, when others do not perceive something as a competition. They bring a spark of fun and adventure to the group. They do not like to make commitments, and may often not keep them, as they prefer to live in the moment. Logic and objectivity do not factor into their behaviors, and they may have a hard time connecting with people who are driven by logic. They prefer a casual feel to the group, rather than a formal structure. They love to talk, and can sometimes dominate conversations.

Concluding Remarks

Anything that is a generalization will always have some margin of error. I meant for this to be fun, and maybe useful,  but it no way is it a rigid rule manual for all human behavior. So definitely take things with a grain of salt. Be aware that people usually have one color they are really strong in, one that is a runner-up, and then a distant one (fourth place) that they have the most difficult time with in others.

I would really love to get your feedback. What did your personality come out as? Did the description fit you as a person who loves to read or write fiction? What parts did not fit? Thanks for stopping by and taking the time to comment!

Why I Believe in Self-publishing: Part II

Thanks for the positive responses to the first installment. It certainly is motivating in keeping me going!

2. Creative Direction

E.L. James. Love her. Hate her. The fact is, there are many people that have purchased and read the 50 Shades books, and they have been wildly popular. I myself have not read them, and based on what I have heard, they are not my cup of tea. One thing these books have really seem to have contributed to is that openly reading sex stories, and talking about sex openly, have become more normal. A really big thing has been that it has become more normal for women to have a sexual identity and a sexuality. As a therapist, I think this is all great.

My point with this is that this book has opened up something of a social movement. I think that society has already been moving toward a more positive view of sexuality and feminine sexuality, so this is not the only factor, but I think it is still hard to deny that these novels have had an impact. If you are not aware, they are fan fiction, based off the Twilight novels (which I have also not read, but they are in my wife’s teacup.)

These novels are fan fiction, and are riddled with raunchy sex that no one has ever openly admitted to enjoying, outside of the red light district in any major city. By every traditional metric, they really had no reason to be successful, and yet they were wildly successful. There is even a movie adaptation coming soon.

As I stated in the previous post on this topic, I do think there are great reasons that traditional publishing has worked for many years. However, I also think there are reasons that self-published novels are rising in popularity. The 50 Shades books would have never been published by a traditional publisher. As I understand the history of this story, it started on websites dedicated to fan fiction, and was later picked up by a small, nontraditional print-on-demand press. From there, E.L. James went on to be named one of Time’s one-hundred most influential people of the year in 2012.

Whether the books are on my “must read” list or not, I have to recognize their reach and impact. I have heard the writing is very poor, yet these books started a movement often referred to as “mommy porn,” that helped many women get more in touch with their sexuality. By all traditional rules and reasoning, this should never have happened. Whether you love E.L. James and  her writing or not, you have to respect the impact. This new direction was only possible through a nontraditional means, forging new ground, with new rules.

So that was my point with all this. I truly believe that writing is an artistic expression. Yet no other art form has so many “rules” that people have to follow. Try to find the equivalent to “show don’t tell” in the world of painting. Realistically, I do not think you will find it, because no other medium of art is bound with so many rules regarding how to express yourself in an acceptable manner. I want to reiterate that I am not a black-and-white, all or nothing type of thinker. I do very much strongly believe that authors should have their books professionally edited, regardless of how they choose to publish them. Therefore, I am not a completely “throw the rule book out the window” type of person. At the same time, I do not know of any other art form that is so rule bound as the writing industry, and artists at times should test the limits and functionality of those rules. E.L. James tested those time honored rules with the 50 shades books, and not only proved some of them to be outdated, but also had an artistic impact on society. 

Traditional publishing uses the antediluvian rules that are the very foundation of publishing since before the Gutenberg press, and those rules have a reason and a purpose, because they have been proven to work. I myself would use a traditional publisher in a heartbeat if the chance presented itself, and I believed that the contract would be beneficial for both parties. However, I really believe that the ability to self-publish has become more than a vanity, it has allowed for creative expression by artists that would have normally not have been allowed to publish, and one may argue the impact has been negative, but one cannot argue that those artists have had an impact. In the end, I think society generally benefits from less fettered, creative expression from modern artists, whether it comes from paint or pen. 

More on this topic in a later post, stay tuned! Please also comment below, and let me know what you think!

Getting There From Here

I went for a bike ride today.

CityCycle Shop via flickr

Five miles in the rain and somewhat chilly autumn weather. In my fiction writing, I have been trying to eliminate as much back-story as possible. It is boring. However, the most important part of any rule is knowing when to break that rule. So, here goes…

A handful of years ago, I had a lot going on. My natural tendency toward self-doubt and fear of disappointing others intermingled with my series of unfortunate life circumstances and led to an anxiety disorder with panic attacks. It was several months before I could even tell my wife, and a few years before I would seek any type of help. I started taking an SSRI to help bring me up out of my somber and dark moods. I started taking Xanax to deal with the times when my anxiety got so overwhelming that I was certain I could not go on. I also tried to improve the way that I think so that I could be more positive with myself and not so self-critical all of the time. I tried to be less critical and negative toward those that I love. I pushed myself to take chances and get out there more. I think sometimes in life, you just need to pop a Xanax, hunker down, and press ahead.

In July of this year, I completely ruptured my Achilles tendon on my right foot. I was in a wheel chair for months. I had to have surgery to reconstruct my tendon so that I could walk again. While I was preparing for the surgery, I had a preoperative check-up. I had an irregular EKG. The EKG showed that I have had a heart attack, though I have never had any symptoms. Since I have never had an EKG before, there was no way to compare to a previous EKG. My doctor ended up saying that my EKG was a “variation of normal,” but it was easy to see that he had no easy answers for me really. In my follow-up appointments, I have had two times where my blood pressure has been high. I weigh more than I have every weighed. I am in the worst shape of my life.

As you may or may not be aware, I took a long break from blogging. Life is busy, hectic, and sometimes difficult. Sometimes something has to give. Often, for me, that is writing. It goes on the back burner when there are too many life demands. I am filled with the same self-doubt in my writing that I am everywhere else, making it sometimes difficult to reach my writing goals. I am still trying to decide what my writing goals for 2014 will be. I want them to be realistic, but also ambitious. I want to achieve my personal victories. I think sometimes in life, you just need to pop a Xanax, hunker down, and press ahead.

Anyway.

I went for a bike ride today.

Why I Believe in Self-publishing

Let me be clear right from the start, I am not a dichotomous thinker. So this is not a self-publishing versus traditional publishing, there can be only one! type of post. I have a lot of respect for many traditionally published authors, and I think it makes quite a bit of sense for those want to be the next J.K. Rowling or Stephen King. I once held that the only way to have a book published was through the traditional means of going through an agent and big publishing company. Over the years, however, I have come to really believe in self-publishing.

1. The Free Market

I honestly believe that there are a few things that should not be free market based, because the concern for profit countermands the very premise of those industries. I do not see publishing as one of those industries. When a few big hands control the flow of any media, there will be both advantages and disadvantages. One advantage will be a more precise control on quality. This makes great sense. If I find a few typos in a book I spent ninety-nine cents on, I will be able to quickly move on. If I find typos in a book I spent fifteen dollars on, I will probably not buy from that author at full-price ever again.

That is often the argument against self-publishing, that the quality suffers. I would contend that there are many ways of determining quality. One way is through the proper use of grammar and punctuation. Another is through sticking to proven elements of literary style. Yet another is through creativity and compelling characters and story. Creativity is one thing that suffers when novels are pressed through a mill whose very design is to ensure conformity to established standards.

I do very much strongly believe that grammar and punctuation are important. As a college instructor, I do really wish I could get many of students to see the value in using proper grammar and punctuation. I also believe that authors can look toward general elements of style that work well. For example, I was very thrown off when trying to read a book with an omniscient point-of-view, and I just could not get into the book. Third-person-limited just works. That is how it became an industry standard. However, I have also read excellent books that had serious flaws, but I still enjoyed them. House of Blades, by Will Wight is a great read. It was a very imaginative fantasy story, in an interesting and unique fantasy world. It has more errors in it than an Astros game. Mr. Wight has not followed some rules, including using professional editing, and having a professionally designed website. Yet he has really done well with his books. How? To me it is easy. The books are imaginative, have compelling characters, and are just fun to read.

Do I wish he had his books edited to remove the glaring typos? Heck yes. However his books have been successful because there is more to the success of a story than following paint-by-number rules that the publishing industry has built their empire on. Again, please do not misinterpret me, I am not saying that those rules are wrong. I am just saying that they do offer only a limited view. Not a wrong view by any means, just limited.

I think that general rules of thumb serve any industry well, especially one that tries to channel creative expression into something that a general group of people will relate to and want to consume. As stated at the beginning though, I am not a black-and-white thinker. There are many ways to achieve success, just like there are many different ways of measuring success. Please come back as I explore this topic further, and explore my other thoughts on why self-publishing here to stay, and why that is a good thing.